Posts From Jeff Voudrie

Jeff Voudrie
Jeff Voudrie is senior portfolio manager of Common Sense Advisors. He serves as a personal, private money manager, counselor and Certified Financial Planner® to clients nationwide. Jeff started in the financial services industry in 1987 and founded his own firm in 2001. He has been interviewed by publications such as The Wall Street Journal, The London Financial Times, and The Christian Science Monitor, to name a few. He’s the author of The Retired Investor’s Survival Guide Series, a former nationally syndicated newspaper columnist of Guarding Your Wealth and appeared on the CNN Financial Network. Jeff’s outside-the-box approach to investing led him to invent the Portfolio Guardian, earning him 3 U.S. Patents in the process. Jeff is sought out by both the media and industry for his extensive knowledge of annuities, including speaking at Financial Planning Association’s regional symposiums. On the personal side, Jeff and his wife of 25 years, Julie, are the proud parents of seven children and reside near the mountains in Tennessee. For more information visit www.CommonSenseAdvisors.com and www.JeffVoudrie.com.
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Stocks Behaving Like Latter Stage Of Market Cycles

In last week’s market commentary, I mentioned that currency wars and deflationary headwinds are curtailing growth. And this makes it hard to buy stocks at elevated levels. In my reviews I talk about how there are market cycles and that the old adage ‘buy low and sell high’ is good…

Currency Wars, Deflationary Headwinds Pressure Investors

An astute client of mine emailed me with a question: “I am concerned about this currency war that is going on with the US dollar. Are there any preventive measures that we should be looking at now to lessen the impact that this will have on the US dollar and…

US Treasury Bonds Recover As Economic Headwinds Persist

The second quarter was a difficult one for those like me that hold exposure to US Treasury Bonds. For those of you that regularly read my weekly commentaries, you know that I have owned ETFs based in US Treasury bonds (symbols TLT and EDV) for several months. The ticker symbol TLT…

Why Stocks May Lag Bonds Over The Near-Term

Are you comfortable putting significant new money to work buying stocks when they are at or near all-time highs? For instance, the S&P 500 hit an all-time high of 1561.80 on October 12, 2007 almost 5 years to the day after the low in 2002. There wasn’t anything special that…

Market Volatility Likely To Hinder Fed Rate Hike

As the Greek drama unfolded last week, we also witnessed a meltdown in the China stock market, an unprecedented 4 hour halt in trading on the New York Stock Exchange, and news that over 21 million Federal workers private information was hacked. Even as the markets recover this week, it’s…

Market Recap: Volatility Hits Stocks and Bonds

This has been a crazy week that included the Greek debt crisis, the Chinese Stock Market meltdown and the New York Stock Exchange ‘HALT’. The markets have been volatile but the ups and downs have been smoothed out by owning both stocks and US Treasury bonds (for me via ETFs). Generally…

Treasury Bonds Head Higher As World Markets Remain Volatile

The U.S. stock market may finally be entering a ‘normal’ correction. Yet, we are only down roughly 3 percent from the highs set in May. Year-to-date (through Monday), the S&P 500 and the Dow Jones Industrial Average are flirting with negative territory, with the S&P 500 up 0.48% and the Dow Jones…

Outcome In Greece Clouds Stocks vs Bonds Debate

With the sudden rush of news hitting the markets, I thought it would be good to provide a quick market update, hitting on the most important points and how they affect key assets like stocks and bonds. For almost seven years now Central Banks have been pursuing a course of lowering…

Why The Federal Reserve Must Keep Hopes Alive

The third revision of the first quarter of 2015’s Gross Domestic Product was released today and it showed that the economy did slightly better than was reported in the ‘second’ revision. The U.S. economy still shrank in the first quarter (contracting 0.2%), just less than initially reported. Corporate profits declined…